Reviewing “Nightmare Before Christmas”


Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was an instant hit.   Everyone, young and old, loved the quirky, clever nature of this animated movie.   But if you’re one of the few who didn’t get around to seeing it in 1993 when it was released, you may want to read a few reviews before you decide if it’s worth your time.   So here are some suggestions on where to find reviews of The Nightmare Before Christmas, as well as a brief review written by this author.

Have you ever wanted to see a film wherein Santa Claus was kidnapped and tortured (it sounds gruesome, I know)?   Or where a man with a pumpkin reigns king over all the land?   Or perhaps a place where holidays have their own lands and the residents of those lands are made from a wide assortment of things (rags, machines, spare parts, etc).   Or where the word “sleigh” refers to “slay,” as in kill.   Well, you’re in luck!   You can find all these things and more in Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas!

Now, reading that review may not have convinced you that you’d really like to see Tim Burton’The Nightmare Before Christmas. But what kind of review would make you want to see it? A warm and fuzzy one that expressed only the happiest of feelings, with a moral message at the end, a noble protagonist, and an obvious antagonist? Perhaps. But that wouldn’t be an honest review either. How about this:


The world of “The Nightmare before Christmas” is an extraordinary one.   It is filled with magic and wonder, where every holiday has its own special land.   The Nightmare Before Christmas tells the story of one Jack Skellington (voice by Danny Elfman), the Pumpkin King of Halloween Town. The epic tale begins out when Jack Skellington is tired with the same old tricks and treats of his life in Halloween Town.   He desires something more out of his life, and soon he finds his way into the magical Christmas Town.   The unique magic and spirit of Christmas Town inspires Jack to bring this exciting holiday back to his friends in Halloween Town.   He decides that he will run Christmas instead of Santa. But then Santa is kidnapped and his plans rapidly begin to deteriorate. Luckily, he has a good friend (who wants to be something more than friends) along the way, Sally the rag doll, who is left sew things back together.

Not only is the plot fascinating and the music superb, but this movie is a benchmark in stop-motion animation.   Just imagine posing twenty-four frames to produce just one second’s worth of action!   It’quite impressive. So whether you’re an art lover, or consider yourself a movie buff, this film is a must see.   Tim Burton’The Nightmare Before Christmas is a masterpiece of art direction, set design, and just plain old good storytelling.   Clever anecdotes like Jack confusing “Sleigh” with the word “slay” or “stockings” becoming “stalking” keep the audience laughing as Christmas and Halloween clash against each other like oil and vinegar.   And throughout this borderline cynical movie, the movie remains light and sweet, a classic must-see for both children and adults.

Maybe that didn’t do it for you either. Or maybe you just want a second opinion. If that’the case, just log onto an Internet browser and type “review of Tim Burton’The Nightmare Before Christmas” in the search bar. You should come with enough different reviews to salve your curiosity. You can also find reviews by searching “movie reviewers” and then looking for a review done by your favorite movie reviewer.