Albert Einstein

Barbara J. Feldman

Albert Einstein, known as one of the greatest scientists of all time, was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. The following sites explore his life and his work – and what struck me most was how accessible Einstein’s theories can be when explained with examples and illustrations.

  • American Institue of Physics: Einstein: Image and Impact5 stars

    The American Institute of Physics site (my pick of the day) explores Einstein's life through historical accounts, photographs and sound clips. The Brief Version (recommended for elementary students and anyone not wanting to read all one hundred pages of the Main Exhibit) can be traversed by following the Next Page link at the very bottom of each page. Clicking on any other links for more detail will take you into the Main Exhibit. To return to your tour through the Brief Version, use your browser back button, or start again at the home page.

  • BrainyQuote: Albert Einstein Quotes4 stars

    "It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer." While I might argue with Einstein's first statement, I can't agree more with his conclusion about the importance of effort. Want to understand relativity? Here's Einstein's short version: "Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute, and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a minute. That's relativity."

  • Einstein4 stars

    "Today, the practical applications of Einstein's theories include the development of the television, remote control devices, automatic door openers, lasers, and DVD-players. Recognized as TIME magazine's 'Person of the Century' in 1999, Einstein's intellect, coupled with his strong passion for social justice and dedication to pacifism, left the world with infinite knowledge and pioneering moral leadership." Calling itself "The Official Site", Einstein.biz has a short biography, a photo gallery, a quote page, but very little about his theories and his work.

  • PBS Nova: Einstein's Big Idea5 stars

    "A hundred years ago, a deceptively simple formula revealed a hidden unity, buried deep in the fabric of the universe. It tells of a fantastic connection between energy, matter and light. Its author was a youthful Albert Einstein. It's the most famous equation in the world: E = mc²." Based on the book "A Biography of the World's Most Famous Equation" by David Bodanis, this full-length movie (narrated by John Lithgow) can be viewed online. A transcript is also available.

  • The Why Files: The Importance of Being Einstein5 stars

    For middle and high school science enthusiasts, The Why Files dive into Einstein's theories about the speed of light and the space-time continuum. Twentieth century physics "has been a long trail of vindication for Einstein's theories." And this great Why Files site takes you by the hand to show how black holes and neutron stars offer proof of theories Einstein made eighty years earlier.

  • Honorable Mentions

    The following links are either new discoveries or sites that didn't make it into my newspaper column because of space constraints. Enjoy!


    Cite This Page

  • Feldman, Barbara. "Albert Einstein." Surfnetkids. Feldman Publishing. 6 Aug. 2013. Web. 30 Jul. 2014. <http://www.surfnetkids.com/resources/albert-einstein/ >.


  • About This Page

  • By . Originally published August 6, 2013. Last modified March 9, 2014.

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