Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte (August 5, 1769 – May 5,1821) aka Napoleon I, was French Emperor (1804 – 1815) in the years after the French Revolution. He is known for his legal reforms (the Napoleonic Code) and also for his military leadership …[Continue]

Gingerbread Houses

Gingerbread Houses

Gingerbread is a baked treat that dates back to the Middle Ages. It is thought to have first appeared in the U.S. in the nineteenth century, when the Swiss monks of St. Meinrad Archabbey in Indiana baked gingerbread on holidays …[Continue]

Pablo Picasso

Pablo Picasso

Born October 25, 1881 in Malaga, Spain, Pablo Picasso became the defining artist of the twentieth century. As I learned about his life, I was struck by the observation that Picasso was blessed with parents who recognized his gift at …[Continue]

Hanukkah

Hanukkah

Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday (alternatively spelled Chanukah or Chanuka) that means “dedication” in Hebrew. It is an eight-day celebration commemorating the Jewish victory over the armies of Syria in 165 B.C.E. and the subsequent liberation and dedication of the …[Continue]

Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) created a new standard for First Ladies because instead of retreating to a private life of decorating and entertaining, Eleanor continued her public life by holding press conferences, giving lectures, doing …[Continue]

Fall of Communism

Fall of Communism

The mostly peaceful Revolutions of 1989 brought the collapse of communist governments in Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. They also marked the end of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the West….[Continue]

Pilgrims of Plymouth

Pilgrims of Plymouth

The Pilgrims were a English Separatist congregation that emigrated to Holland in 1608 to escape religious persecution. Twelve years later, discouraged by economic conditions, the congregation voted to move again, this time to America. A small ship, the Speedwell, carried …[Continue]