Facebook Privacy Policy

by Barbara J. Feldman on April 19, 2011

Facebook Privacy Policy

Facebook has come under serious fire regarding their privacy policy and the sharing of personal information with advertisers to generate revenue.  These things have led to several changed to the social networking giant’s privacy stance, and while many are still skeptical, it seems that the changes are designed to ensure that your personal information stays that way.  The former privacy policy was a bunch of law jargon that your average user could never understand.  The new policy page, however, utilized FAQs and a simplified language to convey their position on user privacy and the steps they are taking to ensure it.

The Collection of Information

No parent wants their children subjected to endless advertisements designed to tug at their innocence.  Facebook collects information on its users regarding interests and hobbies and offers that information up to advertisers for big paydays.  If advertisers are getting their hands on the information, who else is accessing it?  However, Facebook states that they strongly recommend parental oversight in the information their children are sharing on the internet.

The Sharing of Information

Facebook’s privacy stance offers you the ability to make a profile completely private, however, when you’re teen is posting on a site that isn’t private, the information is viewable by anyone.  Due to this dilemma, there is never a truly safe and private haven when considering the use of a social networking site.  Predators are crafty, and despite Facebook’s best efforts, they can find a way to your children if you rely only on the site’s privacy policies.

Public Domain

There is a certain element of privacy that everyone is entitled to.  However, when one posts things on the internet, not even the best of security standards can protect you.  If people are having their identities stolen when using secure credit card processing sites, imagine how easy it can be to access information through a social networking site.

Voluntarily Access

It’s also very important to understand that regardless of Facebook’s Privacy Policy, your child may give their information away by simply “friending” people that they don’t know.  When this happens, the dangers can be at an all-time high.  Once someone is a part of your child’s friend list, they can access pictures, employment locations, school locations, and anything else they offer up.  Any of this information will be used by an online predator to gain the upper hand on your child.

Facebook has done a reasonable job of attempting to protect their users’ privacy.  However, like any website, there are no guarantees.  The only way to ensure that your children’s private information is kept safe is explaining why they shouldn’t post it at all.  This ensures that regardless of a predator’s tactics, they will not be able to show up at school or work to meet your child face to face.  Eliminating the threat of this meeting can make a huge difference when considering the safety of y our child.  Facebook is a part of everyday life and many parents have embraced it.  Just be sure that you’ve familiarized yourself with the Privacy Policy and have explained the dangers to your children.

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Cite This Page

Feldman, Barbara. "Facebook Privacy Policy." Surfnetkids. Feldman Publishing. 19 Apr. 2011. Web. 20 Nov. 2014. <http://www.surfnetkids.com/tech/828/facebook-privacy-policy/ >.