Declaration of Independence

Barbara J. Feldman

This week we travel back in American history to the time of thirteen colonies struggling to free themselves from the rule of the British monarch. The story of the creation of the Declaration of Independence is a dramatic one, and I’ve found some excellent sites that tell the tale.

  • America's Freedom Documents5 stars

    In July of 1776, bells rang out over Philadelphia signaling the approval of the Declaration of Independence by the Continental Congress. Over two hundred years later you can view the original document on your computer. Also available are the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Best clicks are the six mini-movies on topics such as The Real Face of George Washington and Paul Revere, Messenger of the Revolution. Look for the small Videos link at the bottom of any page.

  • Declaring Independence: Drafting the Documents5 stars

    In June of 1776, Thomas Jefferson wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence in congressionally imposed secrecy. In anticipation of a vote for independence, the Continental Congress appointed a committee to compose a document declaring the colonies' independence from Britain. That committee then delegated the task to Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson's first draft of the Declaration can be viewed online at this Library of Congress exhibit. Also on display are fragments of a "Dunlap Broadside," one of twenty-four surviving copies of the first printing of the Declaration of Independence, done by John Dunlap in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776.

  • NARA: Charters of Freedom5 stars

    The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, and the Bill of Rights are the focus of this site from the U.S. National Archives & Records Administration (NARA). The exhibit is designed to be visited sequentially, following a path from the Making of the Charters, three chapters on the documents themselves, and concluding with the Impact of the Charters.

  • PBS: Liberty! Philadelphia 17765 stars

    "PHILADELPHIA July 4, 1776 - In language certain to inspire patriots, and gall the King and England, a Declaration of Independence was adopted today by the Continental Congress. The Declaration is the defiant culmination of years of struggle between the new nation and its former protector." Click on any of the links within this article for popup sidebars with short biographies and interesting background stories. Other recommended clicks include the Road to Revolution quiz and the Timeline of the Revolution.

  • US History: The Declaration of Independence4 stars

    "What's on the back? People who watched the popular movie 'National Treasure' want to know. On the back, at the bottom, upside-down is simply written: 'Original Declaration of Independence / dated 4th July 1776.'" The Declaration of Independence section at US History is huge. Check out The Signers, Jefferson's Account, and the Declaration of Independence Timeline.

  • Honorable Mentions

    The following links are either new discoveries or sites that didn't make it into my newspaper column because of space constraints. Enjoy!


    Cite This Page

  • Feldman, Barbara. "Declaration of Independence." Surfnetkids. Feldman Publishing. 23 Jul. 2013. Web. 16 Sep. 2014. <http://www.surfnetkids.com/resources/declaration-of-independence/ >.


  • About This Page

  • By . Originally published July 23, 2013. Last modified March 9, 2014.

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